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Statistics on prevalence

Official statistics, surveys etc on the prevalence of drug use

Key reading:

European Drug Report 2013: Trends and developments

EMCDDA, 2013
The Trends and developments report presents a top-level overview of the drug phenomenon in Europe, covering drug supply, use and public health problems as well as drug policy and responses. Together with the online Statistical bulletin, Country overviews and Perspectives on drugs, it makes up the 2013 European Drug Report package.
Download: Full report

Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England in 2011

NHS Information Centre, UK, 2012
This report contains results from an annual survey of secondary school pupils in England in years 7 to 11 (mostly aged 11 to 15). 6,519 pupils in 219 schools completed questionnaires in the autumn term of 2011
Web: http://www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/sdd11fullreport

Drug misuse declared

Home Office, UK, 2012
Findings from the 2011/12 Crime Survey for England and Wales which examines the extent and trends in illicit drug use among a nationally representative sample of 16 to 59 year olds resident in households in England and Wales
web: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/drugs-misuse-dec-1112/

Drug Misuse Statistics Scotland 2011

ISD, Scotland, 2012
This annual publication collates the available information on drug use from a range of national data sources
Download: Full report (PDF)

Estimating the National and Local Prevalence of Problem Drug Use in Scotland 2009/10

ISD, Scotland, 2011
This report provides estimates of the national and local prevalence of problem drug use in Scotland in 2009/10 (1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010).
Download: Full report (PDF)

UK Drug Situation - 2011 Edition UK Focal Point on Drugs

EMCDDA, 2011
Annual report to the European monitoring centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction
Download: Full report (5MB PDF) Warning large file

Statistics on drug misuse, England

Health and Social Care Information Centre, UK, 2011
This annual statistical report presents information on drug misuse among both adults and children. It includes a focus on young adults. The topics covered include:

  • Prevalence of drug misuse, including the types of drugs used
  • Trends in drug misuse over recent years
  • Patterns of drug misuse among different groups of the population
  • Health outcomes related to drug misuse including hospital admissions, drug treatment and number of deaths

Download: Full report (PDF)

Estimates of the Prevalence of Opiate Use and/or Crack Cocaine Use, 2009/10

NTA, 2011
This report provides estimates of the prevalence of opiate and/or crack cocaine use at the Government Office Region and national level in England for 2009/10.In total there were an estimated 306,150 opiate and/or crack cocaine users aged 15 to 64 in England in 2009/10 (95% confidence interval (CI) 299,094 – 316,916). This converts to 8.93 per thousand population aged 15 to 64 (95% CI 8.72 – 9.24). The estimated prevalence of opiate use was 7.70 per thousand population aged 15 to 64 (95% CI 7.58 – 7.90) and the estimated prevalence of crack cocaine use was 5.37 per thousand (95% CI 5.18 – 5.70). The estimated prevalence of drug injecting was 3.01 per thousand population aged 15 to 64 (95% CI 2.92 – 3.14). Nationally, there was a decrease in prevalence of opiate and/or crack cocaine use between 2008/09 and 2009/10; this decrease was statistically significant. There was a slight increase in the prevalence of opiate use from 262,428 in 2008/09 (95% confidence interval (CI) 258,782 – 268,517) to 264,072 in 2098/10 (95% confidence interval (CI) 260,023 – 271,048). The estimates for the period 2009/10 also show a decrease in the levels of crack cocaine use, but this was not statistically significant.
Download: Full report (PDF)

Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England in 2010

NHS, Information Centre, 2011
This report contains results from an annual survey of secondary school pupils in England in years 7 to 11 (mostly aged 11 to 15). 7,296 pupils in 246 schools completed questionnaires in the autumn term of 2010.
Web: Summary report (PDF)

Drug Misuse Declared: Findings from the 2010/11 British Crime Survey England and Wales

UK. Home Office, 2011
Home Office Statistical Bulletin 12/11 examines the extent and trends in illicit drug use among a nationally representative sample of 16 to 59 year olds resident in households in England and Wales. The bulletin is based on results from the 2010/11 British Crime Survey (BCS); including comparisons with 2009/10 and trends since 1996.
Web: Full report (PDF)

Comparison of methods and resulting drug use prevalence estimates of health surveys versus drug surveys methods

EMCDDA, 2011
This report is based on work commissioned by the EMCDDA in 2009. It examines differences in methods and results between general population surveys conducted in a single context (focusing exclusively on substance use) and a multi context (focusing on health and healthy lifestyles)
Download: Full report

Statistics on drug misuse, England 2010

NHS Information Centre, 2011
This annual statistical report presents information on drug misuse among both adults and children. It includes a focus on young adults. The topics covered include: Prevalence of drug misuse, including the types of drugs used; Trends in drug misuse over recent years; Patterns of drug misuse among different groups of the population; and health outcomes related to drug misuse including hospital admissions, drug treatment and number of deaths. Download: Full report (PDF)

Making alcohol a health priority: opportunities to reduce alcohol harms and rising costs

Alcohol Concern, 2011
This report shines a spotlight on the rising trends of poor health and wellbeing linked to alcohol misuse in England and the poor state of the current public health response. This report calls to action those who can turn this around by ensuring that alcohol is a public health and NHS priority, with sufficient resourcing that will reach out and improve people’s lives, saving the NHS from a growing cost and disease burden that it can ill afford.
Download: Full report (PDF)

Alcohol statistics Scotland 2011

Scottish Government, 2011
This biennial publication presents the latest available information from a range of national data sources relating to alcohol. These include routine data sources and surveys. The four main sections are: The Alcohol Market, Alcohol Consumption, Alcohol and Health Harm and Alcohol and Social Harm.
web: http://www.alcoholinformation.isdscotland.org/alcohol_misuse/9729.html

2009/10 Scottish Crime and Justice Survey: Drug Use

Scottish Government, 2010
The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey ( SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people's experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on, annually, 16,000 in-home face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland. The SCJS is the only source of information on self-reported drug use among the adult population of Scotland as a whole. Information on experience of illicit drug use was collected through the self-completion section of the questionnaire, which was completed by 13,418 (84%) of the 16,036 respondents to the main SCJS questionnaire.
Web: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/01/21134813/5

UK Drug Situation: UK Focal Point on Drugs 2010 Edition

Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University, UK, Dec 2010
Annual Report to the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction
Web: http://www.cph.org.uk/showPublication.aspx?pubid=707

2010 Annual report on the state of the drugs problem in Europe

EMCDDA, 2010
The report on the state of the drugs problem in Europe presents the EMCDDA's yearly overview of the drug phenomenon. This is an essential reference book for policymakers, specialists and practitioners in the drugs field or indeed anyone seeking the latest findings on drugs in Europe
Web: http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/publications/annual-report/2010

Drug Misuse Statistics Scotland 2010

DMIS, UK, 2010
An annual compendium presenting the latest available information from a range of national data sources relevant to drug misuse
Web: http://www.drugmisuse.isdscotland.org/publications/10dmss/10dmssb.htm

Statistics from the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System (NDTMS) 1 April 2009 – 31 March 2010

NTA, 2010
Statistics published by the National Treatment Agency (NTA) supports evidence of a ‘generational shift’ of drug use in the UK. Young people are increasingly turning away from class A drugs, leaving an aging population of heroin and crack cocaine users.
http://www.nta.nhs.uk/uploads/ndtmsannualreport2009-10finalversion.pdf

Statistics on alcohol, England 2010

NHS Information Centre, 2010
This statistical report presents a range of information on alcohol use and misuse which are drawn together from a variety of published sources and includes additional analysis undertaken by the NHS Information Centre for health and social care.The report aims to present a broad picture of health issues relating to alcohol in England and covers topics such as drinking habits and behaviours among adults (aged 16 and over) and school children (aged 11 to 15), drinking-related mortality, affordability of alcohol and alcohol-related costs.

web: http://www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-collections/health-and-lifestyles/alcohol/statistics-on-alcohol-england-2010

Home Affairs Committee - seventh report. The cocaine trade

UK. House of commons, 2010
This report looks at the cocaine trade, focusing particularly on:

  • Whether cocaine powder is now a street drug rather than just one used recreationally by the relatively well-to-do;
  • The influence of 'celebrity cocaine culture' as criticised in the UNODC's critical report on the UK in 2008;
  • The effectiveness of advertising campaigns in deterring use;
  • Trends in the use of crack cocaine;
  • International collaboration: the responses of the producer countries;
  • International collaboration: the EU's external borders;
  • International collaboration: effects on the transit countries;
  • SOCA's role;
  • HMRC's role; and The police response: possession and dealing.

Web: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200910/
cmselect/cmhaff/74/7405.htm

Drug misuse statistics Scotland

Information Services Division, Edinburgh, 2010
An annual compendium presenting the latest available information from a range of national data sources relevant to drug misuse.
Download: http://www.drugmisuse.isdscotland.org/publications/09dmss/09dmss-000.htm

United Kingdom drug situation: 2009 edition

UK.Dept. of Health, 2010
The structure and content of this annual report are pre-determined by the EMCDDA to facilitate comparison with similar reports produced by the other European Focal Points. Ten chapters cover the same subjects each year, and three further chapters, giving in-depth information on selected issues, change from year to year. Each of the first ten chapters begins with an Introduction. This sets the context for the remainder of the chapter, describing the main features of the topic under consideration within the United Kingdom. This may include information about the main legislative and organisational frameworks, sources of data and definitions used, the broad picture shown by the data and recent trends. The remainder of each chapter is concerned with New Developments and Trends that have not been included in previous annual reports. Generally, this covers developments that have occurred in the second half of 2008 or the first half of 2009. Relevant data that have become available during this period will also be discussed although these will often refer to earlier time periods. This report, and the reports from the other European countries, will be used in the compilation of the EMCDDA’s annual report of the drug situation in Europe to be published in 2010.

Download: Full report (2.4MB PDF)

Scottish crime and justice survey 2008-09: Drug use

Macleod P., Page L., Kinver A., Iliasov A., Williams R. Scottish Government Social Research, 2010.
The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring adults’ experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on, annually, 16,000 in-home face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland. The results or 2008-09 are presented in a series of reports including this one which provides information on self-reported, illicit drug use. This report identifies the extent of self-reported illicit drug use ever, in the last year and in the last month and examines the experience of first drug use and drug use in the last month by adults aged 16 or over.

Self-reported drug use - the SCJS 2008-09 estimated that:

  • A quarter (25.6%) of adults reported taking one or more illicit drugs
    at some point in their lives, even if it was a long time ago
  • One in thirteen (7.6%) adults reported having used one or more
    illicit drugs in the last year, i.e. the 12 months prior to interview
  • Almost one in twenty (4.4%) adults reported using one or more illicit
    drugs in the last month, i.e. the month prior to interview.

Download: Full report (PDF 383KB)

Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England, findings by region

NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care, 2010
This report presents key survey findings by Government Office Region, for secondary school pupils in years 7 to 11 (mostly aged 11 to 15). Results are based on data from the three most recent survey years, 2006 to 2008, combined and weighted to be regionally representative.

In summary, for pupils aged 11 to 15 in England:

  • The percentage of pupils who have ever smoked varies by region from 31 per cent in London to 42 per cent in the North East.
  • The percentage of pupils who are regular smokers (usually smoking at least one cigarette per week), varies by region from 5 per cent in London to 10 per cent in the North East.
  • In London, 39 per cent of pupils have ever had an alcoholic drink; in other regions this percentage varies between 51 per cent in the East Midlands to 63 per cent in the North East.
  • The proportion of pupils who have taken drugs in the last year varies from 15 per cent in the South West to 20 per cent in the North West.
  • The most commonly taken drug in this age group is cannabis. The prevalence of cannabis use in the last year varies from 8 per cent in the North East to 12 per cent in the North West.

Download: Full report (PDF 117KB)

Future proof: Can we afford the cost of drinking too much? mortality, morbidity and drink-driving in the UK

Plant M., Coghill N., Miller P., Alcohol Concern, 2009
This report provides vital new evidence on alcohol-related deaths showing that an increase of one litre in per capita consumption would lead to 928 alcohol-related deaths in the UK per annum. Government should therefore target a reduction in consumption as a principle national objective. This means ensuring that those who drink do so at lower levels, particularly those drinking at chronic, heavy and risky levels. The evidence available, following work from Meier and Booth et al. (2008), shows that these heavy drinkers are responsible for consuming most of the alcohol sold and that it is cheap alcohol that they predominantly choose to drink. The rise of very cheap, affordable alcohol has led to an increase in consumption and hence a tripling of alcohol-related mortality over the past 25 years.
Download: Full report (PDF 700KB)

Statistics on drug misuse: England, 2009

Health and Social Care Information Centre, 2009
This document has been produced to help commissioners of services e.g. Drug and Alcohol Action teams (DAATs) and project teams who are considering establishing or further developing Alcohol Arrest Referral (AAR) schemes. This annual statistical report presents a range of information on drug misuse amongst both adults and children. It also includes a focus on young adults. The report is primarily concerned with the use of illicit drugs. The topics covered include:

  • Prevalence of drug misuse, including the types of drugs used;
  • Trends in drug misuse over recent years;
  • Patterns of drug misuse among different groups of the population; and
  • Health outcomes related to drug misuse including hospital admissions, drug treatment and numbers of deaths.

Download: Full report (PDF 318KB)

Road casualties: drinking and driving, 2008

Welsh Assembly Government, 2009
These statistics on Road Casualties: Drinking and Driving include data for Wales for the period up to the end of December 2008.
Download: Full report (PDF 355KB)
Web: http://wales.gov.uk/topics/statistics/headlines/trans2009/hdw200912011/?lang=en

Drugs in Wales, 2008-09

Welsh Assembly Government, 2009
This statistical bulletin examines trends in drug use, drug-related crime, drug seizures and public perceptions in Wales between 2004 and 2009 and compares Wales with the nine English Government Office Regions for 2008-09. Sources used include police recorded crime, the British Crime Survey (BCS) and drugs seizures made by law enforcement agencies in England and Wales.
Download: Full report (PDF 334KB)

2009 Annual report: the state of the drugs problem in Europe

EMCDDA, Lisbon, 2009.
The report on the state of the drugs problem in Europe presents the EMCDDA's yearly overview of the drug phenomenon. This is an essential reference book for policymakers, specialists and practitioners in the drugs field or indeed anyone seeking the latest findings on drugs in Europe. Published every autumn, the report contains non-confidential data supported by an extensive range of figures.
Web: http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/publications/annual-report/2009
Download: Full report (PDF 3MB) Warning: large file

Drug misuse declared: findings from the 2008/9 British Crime Survey

UK. Home Office, 2009.
This annual statistical bulletin examines the prevalence and trends of illicit drug use among a nationally representative sample of 16 to 59 year olds (with a particular focus on young people aged 16 to 24) resident in households in England and Wales
Web:
Full report (PDF 844KB)

Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England in 2008

NHS Information Centre, 2009.
This survey is the latest in a series designed to monitor smoking, drinking and drug use among secondary school pupils aged 11 to 15. Information was obtained from 7,798 pupils in 264 schools throughout England in the autumn term of 2008.
Web: Full report (PDF 2.27MB)

Estimating the national and local prevalence of problem drug misuse in Scotland

Hay G., Gannon M., Casey J., McKeganey N., University of Glasgow, 2009
In this report the authors outline the results of a study funded by the Scottish Government and the University of Glasgow to provide estimates of the prevalence of problem drug misuse in Scotland. The estimates refer to the calendar year 2006. The study used the capture-recapture method and focussed on those aged 15-64 years old. Estimates of the prevalence of opiate and / or benzodiazepine misuse have been provided for every Council area, Drug and Alcohol Action Team (ADAT) area, NHS Board area, Community Justice Authority area and Police Force area within Scotland. Estimates of the prevalence of drug injecting are also given at the Council and NHS Board area level. These estimates are compared with the results of a previous study relating to 2003. In addition, this study has also provided estimates of the prevalence of opiate and / or benzodiazepine misuse at the Community Health Partnership (CHP) level within Fife and Glasgow. There were too few data to provide estimates for crack cocaine use. Moreover, there was difficulty obtaining estimates of psychostimulant use more generally.
Web: Full report (PDF 341KB)

Drug use in Ireland and Northern Ireland 2006/2007 Drug Prevalence Survey: polydrug use results

National Advisory Committee on Drugs (NACD) & Drug and Alcohol Information and Research Unit (DAIRU), 2009.
This bulletin presents key findings on polydrug use (the use of more than one substance within a specific time period) in Ireland and Northern Ireland. It presents data collected in the All Ireland Drug Prevalence Survey 2006/2007 relating to polydrug use on a last month (current use) basis. The focus is on the combinations of both legal and illegal drugs based on information obtained from the second drug prevalence survey of households. The bulletin also examines gender and age differences and the relationship between the use of a particular substance and the use of another substance. The survey was carried out by Ipsos MORI in Ireland and by the Central Survey Unit of the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency in Northern Ireland according to standards set by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).
Web: http://www.nacd.ie/publications/NACDPolydrugUseBulletin5.pdf (PDF)

Measuring the harm from illegal drugs: a summary of the Drug Harm Index 2006

UK Home Office, 2009
The Drug Harm Index (DHI) was developed as the overarching measure for the PSA target to reduce the harm caused by illegal drugs. It combines robust national indicators of the harms generated by illegal drugs into a single-figure time-series index. The harms include drug-related crime, community perceptions of drug problems, drug nuisance, and the various health consequences that arise from drug abuse. This latest update adds data for 2006 and incorporates revised figures for earlier years. It shows that the DHI has fallen from 80.5 in 2005 to 68.8 in 2006. This is a drop of 11.7 points or 14.5 per cent. This compares to a decrease of 5.7 per cent between 2004 and 2005. The index has now fallen year-on-year since 2001.The fall in the DHI between 2005 and 2006 is largely due to reductions in drug-related crime and a decrease in drug deaths
Download: Full report (PDF 220KB)

Home Office Statistical Bulletin 08/09 - Seizures of Drugs in England and Wales, 2007/08

UK. Home Office, 2009
There were a record 216,792 drug seizures by police and HM Revenue and Customs in England and Wales in 2007/081, an increase of 17 per cent on 2006/07, when 186,028 seizures were made. The number of drug seizures made has doubled between 2004 and 2007/08. Much of this increase is thought to be associated with the introduction of cannabis warnings (see box one on page five). Seizures of cannabis, in its various forms, have increased from 77,482 in 2004 to 164,888 in 2007/08. There has been an increase in the number of seizures for all classes of drug Class A seizures have increased by eight per cent over the last year. Seizures for class B drugs have increased by four percent and seizures of class C drugs have increased by 20 per cent since 2006/07. Cocaine was the most commonly seized class A drug in 2007/08, with 20,318 seizures, a 26 per cent increase over the year and 70 per cent higher than in 2005. Heroin seizures increased slightly, by two per cent. There were 3.4 tonnes of cocaine seized in England and Wales in 2007/08, 1.0 tonnes of heroin, 1.8 tonnes of amphetamines, 36.5 tonnes of cannabis and over 500,000 cannabis plants. The number of drug seizures should not be used as a measure of drug prevalence in England and Wales.
Download: Full report (PDF 170KB)
Web: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs09/hosb0809.pdf (PDF)

Drug use: an overview of general population surveys in Europe

EMCDDA, 2009.
The present study provides an overview of the general population surveys on drug use in Europe. It focuses on the most recent surveys, i.e. surveys conducted since 2001. An effort has been made to complete and update the 2001 EMCDDA overview, to make a detailed comparison of methods and designs used in prevalence studies in European countries, and to evaluate their strengths, restrictions and compliance with the European Model Questionnaire (EMQ).
Download: Full report (PDF 1.8MB)

European school survey project on alcohol and other drugs

Espad, 2009.
Use of illicit drugs among 15–16-year-old school students, appears to have stabilised or slightly fallen, according to the latest European study of this group. The report, which follows a 2007 survey conducted in 35 European countries, also reveals a decrease in last-month rates of cigarette smoking among school students. However, it sounds the alarm over clear rises in the group’s ‘heavy episodic drinking’, and the narrowing gender gap in this behaviour. This is the fourth data-collection wave conducted by the ESPAD project, with multi-national surveys carried out in 1995, 1999, 2003 and 2007. Over 100,000 school students took part in the latest survey. Of the countries participating, 25 were EU Member States. The 2007 ESPAD report: substance use among students in 35 countries, available in English, will be complemented by a multilingual summary produced with the support of the EU drugs agency (EMCDDA). The EMCDDA includes ESPAD data in its annual reporting on the drug situation and the two bodies work closely together under a cooperation framework signed in 2007. One of the aims of this accord is to broaden access to the information and expertise gathered by the project.
Download: Summary (PDF 1.5MB)
Web: Full report

Drug and alcohol services in Scotland

Audit Scotland, 2009.
This report provides further evidence of Scotland’s growing problem with drug and alcohol misuse. Drug and alcohol-related death rates are among the highest in Europe and have doubled in the past 15 years. Alcohol misuse is an even bigger problem than drug misuse. Alcohol problems affect many more people and cause three times the number of deaths compared with drug misuse. Key recommendations from the report include: set clear national minimum standards for drug and alcohol services; clarify accountability and governance arrangements for the delivery of services; ensure all services are based on an assessment of local need and are regularly evaluated; ensure service specifications are in place; set clear criteria for effectiveness. Audit Scotland have produced a checklist to improve the delivery of services.
Download: Full report (PDF 3MB - Warning: large file)

Wasted opportunities: Problematic alcohol and drug use among gay men and bisexual men

Sigma Research, 2009.
This study examined problematic alcohol and drug use among gay men and bisexual men and service and policy responses to the needs that this use generates.
Download: Full report (PDF 465KB)

Getting to grips with substance misuse among young people - the data for 2007/08

NTA, 2009.
Reliable statistics on young people under 18 who receive specialist support for drug and alcohol misuse have been scarce.To address this, the National Treatment Agency (NTA) started recording data in 2005/06. This report summarises the data for 2007/08, together with information about the different typesof interventions and the context in which these young people misuse substances
Download: Full report (PDF 545KB)

UK. New developments, trends and in-depth information on selected issues: 2008 Annual report to the EMCDDA

Reitox National Focal Point, 2009.
The 2008 UK Focal Point's Annual Report provides information on the drug situation in the UK, a discussion of the main trends and a description of the responses to the situation. It covers national policies on drugs, prevalence, prevention, problem drug use, drug-related treatment, health correlates and consequences, social correlates and consequences, drug markets, public expenditure, vulnerable groups of young people and drug-related research in Europe.
Web: http://www.ukfocalpoint.org.uk/documentbank/
UK_FOCAL_POINT_ANNUAL_REPORT_2008_pdf.pdf

Download: Full report (PDF 1007KB)

Drug Misuse Scotland 2008

The Substance Misuse Information Strategy Team, (ISD Scotland), NHS Scotland, 2008.
This annual publication presents the latest available information from a range of national data sources relevant to drug misuse. There are three main sections:
Services and treatment for drug misusers. This section includes information on individuals presenting to drug treatment services and prescription statistics.
Health impact of drug misuse. This section includes information on inpatients and day cases discharged from general hospitals and psychiatric hospitals, general practice consultations, maternity and neonatal information, blood-borne viruses and drug-related deaths in Scotland.
Drugs and criminal justice. This section includes information on drug-related offences and court proceedings, criminal justice social work, drug misuse and treatment in Scottish prisons and seizures of controlled drugs.
Download: Full report (PDF 1.08MB)

Drug Use in Ireland and Northern Ireland 2006/2007 Drug Prevalence survey: cannabis results

Ipsos MORI, Central Survey Unit of the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, 2008.
This bulletin provides a comprehensive overview of many different aspects of cannabis use in Ireland and Northern Ireland. It presents data gathered in the All-Ireland Drug Prevalence Survey 2006/2007 relating to cannabis use on a lifetime (ever used), last year (recent use), and last month (current use) basis and compares these results with 2002/3 data. The bulletin also examines age of first use, regular use, types of cannabis used, method by which cannabis is used, how and where cannabis is obtained, reasons for stopping use, attitudes towards cannabis use, perceptions of risk and the profile of typical cannabis users. The survey was carried out by Ipsos MORI in Ireland and by the Central Survey Unit of the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency in Northern Ireland according to standards set by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).
Download: Full report (PDF 601KB)

Home Office Research Report 09 - National and regional estimates of the prevalence of opiate use and/or crack cocaine use 2006/07: a summary of key findings

UK.Home Office, 2008.
This report summarises the results of the third and final sweep of a three-year study to estimate the prevalence of problematic use of opiates and/or crack cocaine nationally (England only), regionally, and locally. Innovative methods have been used to estimate this hard-to-reach population, namely the Capture-Recapture method, and the Multiple Indicator Method. These methods make use of data that is available at the local level, such as probation, crime and drug treatment data. The estimates are also disaggregated by drug type (opiate, crack and/or drug injecting), and by age and gender. Overall, in 2006/07 there were an estimated 328,767 problem drug users in England; this corresponds to 9.76 per thousand in the population aged 15-64. These figures show that the estimate for the total number of problem drug users has remained stable across the three sweeps. Since the first sweep there has been a statistically significant reduction in the prevalence of drug injectors, which has fallen from 4.16 per thousand in 2004/05 to 3.47 per thousand in 2006/07. The estimates are provided as a guidance to help with needs assessment and service planning at the local level.
Download: Full report (PDF 109 KB)

Shooting up: infections among injecting drug users in the United Kingdom 2007. An update: October 2008.

Health Protection Agency, Centre for Infections, Health Protection Scotland
National Public Health Service for Wales, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre Northern Ireland & Centre for Research on Drugs & Health Behaviour, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 2008.
This report provides statistics on bacterial and viral infections among injecting drugs users, i.e. hepatitis A, B and C, HIV, HTLV ii, Staphylococcus aureus Infections, Group A Streptococcal Infections and Clostridial Infections. The report looks at Priorities for the Commissioning of Services for Drug Users and Priorities for Public Health Surveillance Development and Research.
Download: Full report (PDF 1.6 MB)

Drug use in Ireland and Northern Ireland. 2006/7 drug prevalence survey: cocaine results

Ireland. National Advisory Committee on Drugs, Public Health Information and Research Branch, 2008.
This bulletin provides a comprehensive overview of many different aspects of cocaine use in Ireland and Northern Ireland. It presents data gathered in the All Ireland Drug Prevalence Survey 2006/2007 relating to both cocaine powder and crack cocaine use on a lifetime (ever used), last year (recent use), and last month (current use) basis. The bulletin also examines age of first use, regular use, and method of taking cocaine, ease of obtaining cocaine, reasons for stopping use, perceptions of risk and the profile of cocaine users. The survey was carried out by Ipsos MORI in Ireland and by the Central Survey Unit of the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency in Northern Ireland according to standards set by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).
Download: Full report (PDF 680KB)

Tale of two generations - results of an Addaction, YouGov and Dubit survey among adults and young people

Addaction, 2008.
One in five (19 per cent) young people say their parents have taken drugs and one in ten (nine per cent) say their parents still take drugs. Yet overwhelmingly young people describe themselves as being ‘against’ drugs (90 per cent) and only one in ten (nine per cent) think celebrities make taking drugs seem ‘cool’ The Addaction YouGov and DUBIT questioned almost 2000 adults and 500 young people selected at random in England and Scotland about their attitudes towards drugs and alcohol, reveals signs that the generation gap is closing between parents and their children on drugs.
Download: Full report (PDF 227KB)

EMCDDA Statistical Bulletin 2008

EMCDDA, 2008.
The Statistical bulletin is published yearly by the EMCDDA and provides access to the most recent statistical data relating to the drugs situation in Europe. It constitutes the epidemiological basis on which the Annual report on the state of the drugs problem in Europe is written.
Web: http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/stats08

World Drug Report 2007

United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2008.
The World Drug Report presents a comprehensive statistical view of today's illicit drug situation. This year's edition reports signs of long-term containment of the global problem. However, the overall trend masks contrasting regional situations, which the report examines in detail. For instance, while an impressive multi-year reduction in opium poppy cultivation continued in South-East Asia, Afghanistan recorded a large increase in 2006. More interceptions of cocaine and heroin shipments across the world have played an important part in stabilizing the market. Although drug abuse levels are stabilizing globally, countries along major and new trafficking routes, such as those now going through Africa, may face increasing levels of drug consumption. The World Drug Report 2007 also discusses a possible method to better assess and monitor the role played by organized crime in transnational drug trafficking.
Web: http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/WDR-2007.html

Drug misuse in England 2008

NHS, The information Centre for Health and Social Care, 2008.
This annual statistical report presents information on drug misuse among adults and children. The topics covered include: prevalence of drug misuse; patterns of drug misuse among different groups of the population; health outcomes related to drug misuse including hospital admissions; drug treatment and deaths related to drug misuse.The bulletin also summarises government plans and targets in the area, as well as providing sources of further information and links to relevant documents. Key facts include that: overall drug use has fallen in recent years for both adults and children; hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of a drug-related mental health and behavioural disorder have decreased, while admissions with a primary diagnosis of poisoning by drugs have increased; the number in contact with drug treatment services have increased; the number of drug-related deaths shows no overall trend, and more men than women had used drugs in the last year.
Web: http://www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-collections/health-and-lifestyles/drug-misuse/statistics-on-drug-misuse:-england-2008-full-report

Drug use, smoking and drinking among young people in England in 2007

NHS, The information Centre for Health and Social Care, 2008.
This report contains results from an annual survey of secondary school pupils aged in years 7 to 11 (mostly aged 11 to 15). Overall, 7,831 pupils in 273 schools in England completed questionnaires in the autumn term of 2007. This is the most recent survey in a series that began in 1982. Each survey since 1998 has included a core set of questions on smoking, drinking and drug use and, since 2000, the remainder of the questionnaire has focused in alternate years on smoking and drinking or on drug misuse. The emphasis of the 2007 survey is on drug misuse.

In summary for pupils aged 11 to 15 in England, 2007:

  • ten per cent of pupils said they had taken drugs in the last month, down from 12 per cent in 2001
  • six per cent of pupils aged 11 to 15 smoked regularly (at least once a week); lower than at any time since pupils' smoking was first measured in the survey in 1982
  • one in five pupils (20 per cent) had drunk alcohol in the last seven days, a proportion which has declined from 26 per cent in 2001
  • 29 per cent of pupils reported recent smoking (in the last seven days), drinking (in the last seven days) or drug use (in the last month). Just four per cent of pupils had done all three recently
  • boys and girls had a similar prevalence for recent drug use and for recent drinking. However, girls were more likely to smoke regularly. Among those who drank, boys average alcohol consumption was higher than girls (13.1 units per week for boys compared with 12.4 for girls).

Web: Selection of reports including full report
Download: Summary report (PDF 232KB)

Crime in England and Wales 2007/08 - Findings from the British Crime Survey and police recorded crime

Chris Kershaw, Sian Nicholas and Alison Walker eds. UK. Home Office, 2008.
The Home Office have released data from the 2007/08 British Crime Survey, some of which relates to trends in drug-taking. Key findings include:

  • the overall use of any illicit drug has fallen among both the 16 – 59 and the 16 – 24 age groups since 2006/07;
  • the use of class A drugs also fell among both the 16 – 59 and the 16 – 24 age groups since 2006/07;
  • among 16 –24 year olds the overall use of illicit drugs is at its lowest ever level since 1995

Download: Full report (PDF 1.9MB) Warning: large file

Cannabis supply and young people

Martin Duffy, Nadine Schafer, Ross Coomber, Lauren O’Connell and Paul Turnbull, JRF, 2008.
How do young people obtain cannabis? A snapshot view from a large city and rural villages? The supply of drugs to young people is an emotive subject with discussion rarely referring to actual evidence, which is in any case scarce. What evidence exists shows that many young people gain access to drugs through older brothers and sisters, through friends and friends of friends, so-called ‘social supply’ networks. This study interviewed 182 young people aged 11–19, all of whom had used cannabis and/or been involved in cannabis transactions in recent months. This group is unlikely to be representative of young people in general, so the report presents a snapshot view.

The study looks at:

  • How and where young people got hold of cannabis;
  • What involvement, if any, they had in supplying cannabis to others;
  • How young people paid for cannabis;
  • Responses from schools and police to cannabis use among young people;
  • Implications for legislation and enforcement guidelines around cannabis use, in particular the issue of ‘social supply’.

Download: Full report (PDF 0.5MB)

Report of the International Narcotics Control Board for 2007

INCB, 2008.
This report covers the latest statistics on drug traficking, production and consumption throughout the world. It provides an analysis of the operation of the international drug control system including, information on precursors, promoting the application of international drug control treaties, and measures that can be taken to ensure their implementation. Recommendations are made to Governments, the United Nations and other relevant organisations.
Web: http://www.incb.org/incb/en/annual-report-2007.html

Drug use in Ireland and Northern Ireland: first results from 2006/2007 drug prevalence survey

National Advisory Committee on Drugs (NACD) & Drug and Alcohol Information and Research Unit (DAIRU), 2008.
This bulletin presents key findings from the second drug prevalence survey of households in both Ireland and Northern Ireland. The survey sampled a representative number of people aged between 15 and 64 during late 2006 and early 2007. The survey was carried out according to standards set by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA). Data relating to drug prevalence on a lifetime, last year (recent) and last month (current) basis for Ireland, Northern Ireland, and the Island of Ireland are presented in this bulletin. Statistically significant changes in prevalence rates between 2002/3 and 2006/7 are presented at the end of each results section.
Web: http://www.nacd.ie/publications/Survey_Final_25thJan.pdf (PDF)

UK - new developments, trends and in-depth information on selected issues. 2007 National Report (2006 data) to the EMCDDA

Reitox National Focal Point, 2007.
The 2007 UK Focal Point's Annual Report provides information on the drug situation in the UK, a discussion of the main trends and a description of the responses to the situation. It covers national policies on drugs, prevalence, prevention, problem drug use, drug-related treatment, health correlates and consequences, social correlates and consequences, drug markets, public expenditure, vulnerable groups of young people and drug-related research in Europe.
Web: http://www.ukfocalpoint.org.uk/web/Publications201.asp
Download: Full report (PDF 1.1MB)

Drug misuse declared; findings from the 2006/07 British Crime Survey - England and Wales

Roe S., Murphy R., UK. Home Office, 2007.
This statistical bulletin considers the extent of illicit drug use among 16 to 59 year olds in England and Wales in 2006/07 and trends in drug use since 1998 (the beginning of the Government’s Drug Strategy) based on data from the British Crime Survey (BCS). It particularly focuses on young people and also looks at demographic and geographical variations in drug use.
Download: Full report (PDF 512KB)

Drugs misuse in Scotland: findings from the 2006 Scottish crime and victimisation survey

Matthew Brown and Keith Bolling, BMRB Social Research, 2007.
The SCVS drugs report is based on data from the self-completing section of the SCVS questionnaire. It looks to estimate the prevalance of illicit drug taking in the general population.
Web: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/09/26163243/0

Measuring different aspects of problem drug use: methodological developments

Singleton, Murray, Tinsley, Home Office, 2006.
This report is an update on earlier work that sought to estimate the number of problem drug users, the social and economic cost of Class A drug use and the size of the illicit drug market.According to the new data, there are an estimated 327,466 problem drug users in England using opiates and/or crack cocaine. To obtain this estimate, researchers used four data sources: drug treatment, probation, police and prison data, and the results are broken down by DAT area.
Download: Full report (PDF 1.3MB)

The drugs survey

YouthNet, 2006.
YouthNet's survey into drug use amongst young people. Areas covered include: money spent on drugs, frequency of use, first drug used, best and worst experiences with drugs and many related issues.
Download: Final report (PDF 142KB)

Statistical bulletin: statistics on young people and drug misuse: England 2006

Department of Health, 2006.
Full report on prevalence and patterns of drug use among young people. Includes tables.
Web: http://www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/youngpeopledrugmisuse2006
Please note that it is necessary to register to download the report and tables.

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