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Drug related deaths

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Drug-related deaths in Scotland 2011

National statistics for Scotland, UK, 2012

Statistics of drug-related deaths in 2011 and earlier years, broken down by age, sex, selected drugs reported, underlying cause of death and NHS Board and Council areas.
Web: http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/files2/stats/drug-related-deaths/2011/drug-related-deaths2011.pdf

Alcohol-related deaths in the United Kingdom, 2010

ONS, 2011

In 2010 there were 8,790 alcohol-related deaths in the UK, 126 more than in 2009 (8,664)

  • There are more alcohol-related deaths in males than in females, with 67 per cent of all alcohol related deaths in the UK in 2010 being male
    Alcohol-related death rates were highest for those aged 55-74 and lowest for those aged under 35 over the last ten years
  • UK males aged 55-74 years showed a sharp and statistically signficant increase in alcohol related death rate from 41.8 per 100,000 in 2009 to 45.2 per 100,000 in 2010
  • Alcohol-related death rates varied between the regions of England and tended to be highest in the North and lowest in the East of England over the last ten years
  • Within England and Wales, alcohol-related death rates are higher in Wales. In 2010 this difference was statistically significant

Web: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171778_254061.pdf

Drug-related deaths and deaths among drug users in Ireland: 2009 figures from the National Drug-Related Deaths Index

Health Research Board, Ireland 2011
This update presents figures from the National Drug-Related Deaths Index (NDRDI) on deaths due to poisoning by alcohol and/or other drugs, and deaths among drug users, in the period 2004–2009. Alcohol-only poisonings have been retrospectively recorded by the NDRDI from 2004 onwards and are included in this update. The figures in this update supersede all previously published figures.
Download: Full report (PDF)

The National Drug Related Deaths Database (Scotland) Report 2009

ISD,Scotland,2010
This is the first report from the National Drug Related Death Database (NDRDD) for the calendar year 2009. Against a background of a continuing rise in the number of drug related deaths in recent years in Scotland, the NDRDD was established to collect in depth information on the nature and circumstances of individuals who had died a drug related death. Drawing from a wide range of local data sources, the report provides a comprehensive picture of the majority of nationally reported drug related deaths. It sets these 432 deaths in a wider context including the individual’s social circumstances and their previous contact with health and criminal justice services.
Web: http://www.drugmisuse.isdscotland.org/publications/local/NDRDD_2009.pdf

Drug Related Deaths and Deaths due to Drugs Misuse Registered in Northern Ireland, 1999-2009

Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, 2010
This report looks at the most recent official death registration data available on drug related mortality
Download: Full report (PDF)

Alcohol Related Deaths Registered in Northern Ireland, 1999-2009

Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, 2010
This report looks at the most recent official death registration data available on alcohol related mortality
Download: Full report (PDF)

Alcohol-related deaths in the United Kingdom 1991-2008

UK.Office for National Statistics, 2010
The number of alcohol-related deaths in the United Kingdom has consistently increased since the early 1990s, rising from the lowest figure of 4,023 (6.7 per 100,000) in 1992 to the highest of 9,031 (13.6 per 100,000) in 2008. Although figures in recent years suggested that the trend was levelling out, alcohol-related deaths in males increased further in 2008. Female rates have remained stable. There are more alcohol-related deaths in men than in women. The rate of male deaths has more than doubled over the period from 9.1 per 100,000 in 1991 to 18.7 per 100,000 in 2008. There have been steadier increases in female rates, rising from 5.0 per 100,000 in 1991 to 8.7 in 2008, less than half the rate for males. In 2008, males accounted for approximately two-thirds of the total number of alcohol-related deaths. There were 5,999 deaths in men and 3,032 in women.
Download: Full report (PDF 84KB)

Future proof: Can we afford the cost of drinking too much? mortality, morbidity and drink-driving in the UK

Plant M., Coghill N., Miller P., Alcohol Concern, 2009
This report provides vital new evidence on alcohol-related deaths showing that an increase of one litre in per capita consumption would lead to 928 alcohol-related deaths in the UK per annum. Government should therefore target a reduction in consumption as a principle national objective. This means ensuring that those who drink do so at lower levels, particularly those drinking at chronic, heavy and risky levels. The evidence available, following work from Meier and Booth et al. (2008), shows that these heavy drinkers are responsible for consuming most of the alcohol sold and that it is cheap alcohol that they predominantly choose to drink. The rise of very cheap, affordable alcohol has led to an increase in consumption and hence a tripling of alcohol-related mortality over the past 25 years.
Download: Full report (PDF 700KB)

Trends in deaths among drug users in Ireland from traumatic and medical causes, 1998 to 2005

Health Research Board, 2009
The analysis presented in this paper is the first national report on non-poisoning deaths among drug users in Ireland. The data presented describe trends in non-poisoning deaths (deaths due to traumatic or medical causes) among drug users between 1998 and 2005. The data used for the analysis presented in this paper were obtained from the National Drug-Related Deaths Index (NDRDI) maintained by the Alcohol and Drug Research Unit of the Health Research Board. The NDRDI records data from four different sources on drug-related deaths and deaths among drug users and among those who are alcohol dependent. These data give a reliable estimate of the total burden of mortality related to drug use in Ireland
Download: Full report (PDF 366KB)

Deaths related to drug poisoning in England and Wales, 2008

UK Office for National Statistics, 2009
The number of deaths related to drug poisoning, which includes deaths involving both legal and illegal drugs, for males was 2,075 in 2008, an increase of 8 per cent compared to 2007 and the highest number since 2001. The number of female deaths rose to 853 in 2008, an increase of 17 per cent compared with 2007, after falling for the previous three years from 2005 to 2007. There were 897 deaths involving heroin or morphine in 2008, an 8 per cent rise compared to 2007, and the highest number since 2001. There were 235 deaths involving cocaine in 2008, an increase of 20 per cent compared with 2007 and a continuation of the upward trend. The number of deaths involving antidepressants increased slightly from 335 in 2007 to 381 in 2008, but over the period 2004 to 2008 as a whole this figure has decreased by 19 per cent. In 2008, the total number of drug misuse deaths rose to 1,738, the highest level recorded since 2001. The figures presented here are the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) database of deaths from drug-related poisoning, for the period 2004 to 2008.

Download: Full report (PDF 310KB)
Web: http://www.statistics.gov.uk/pdfdir/dgdths0809.pdf (PDF 310KB)

National forum on drug-related deaths in Scotland: Annual report 2008-9

Scottish Government, 2009.
This is the second annual report from the National Forum on Drug Related Deaths. The report includes statistics, discussions and presentations relating to what has been learned from previous years.
Web: Full report

Drug-related deaths in the UK - Annual report

Ghodse H., Corkery J., Oyefeso A., Schifano F., Ahmed K., Naidoo V. St George's University of London, 2009.
An annual report which analyses drug-related deaths that have occurred in the preceding calendar year and comments on emerging trends. An executive summary of the annual report is also published.

Download: Full report (PDF 0.8MB)

Web - full report: http://www.sgul.ac.uk/about-st-georges/divisions/faculty-of-medicine-and-biomedical-sciences/mental-health/icdp/website-pdfs/np-SAD%2010th%20annual%20report.pdf (PDF 0.8MB)

Web - summary: http://www.sgul.ac.uk/about-st-georges/divisions/faculty-of-medicine-and-biomedical-sciences/mental-health/icdp/website-pdfs/Executive%20Summary%20np-SAD%20AR%202009.pdf (PDF 0.8MB)

Measuring the harm from illegal drugs: a summary of the Drug Harm Index 2006

UK Home Office, 2009
The Drug Harm Index (DHI) was developed as the overarching measure for the PSA target to reduce the harm caused by illegal drugs. It combines robust national indicators of the harms generated by illegal drugs into a single-figure time-series index. The harms include drug-related crime, community perceptions of drug problems, drug nuisance, and the various health consequences that arise from drug abuse. This latest update adds data for 2006 and incorporates revised figures for earlier years. It shows that the DHI has fallen from 80.5 in 2005 to 68.8 in 2006. This is a drop of 11.7 points or 14.5 per cent. This compares to a decrease of 5.7 per cent between 2004 and 2005. The index has now fallen year-on-year since 2001.The fall in the DHI between 2005 and 2006 is largely due to reductions in drug-related crime and a decrease in drug deaths
Download: Full report (PDF 220KB)

Drug and alcohol services in Scotland

Audit Scotland, 2009.
This report provides further evidence of Scotland’s growing problem with drug and alcohol misuse. Drug and alcohol-related death rates are among the highest in Europe and have doubled in the past 15 years. Alcohol misuse is an even bigger problem than drug misuse. Alcohol problems affect many more people and cause three times the number of deaths compared with drug misuse. Key recommendations from the report include: set clear national minimum standards for drug and alcohol services; clarify accountability and governance arrangements for the delivery of services; ensure all services are based on an assessment of local need and are regularly evaluated; ensure service specifications are in place; set clear criteria for effectiveness. Audit Scotland have produced a checklist to improve the delivery of services.
Download: Full report (PDF 3MB - Warning: large file)

Drug related deaths and deaths due to drug misuse registered in Northern Ireland (1997-2007)

NIRSA, 2009.
The report highlights that the number of drug related deaths registered each year has more than doubled over the last decade from 39 deaths in 1997 to 86 deaths in 2007. The report also indicates that over the last decade the median age at death for drug related deaths was 40 years, 38 years less than the overall median age at death of 78 years.
Download: Full report (PDF 206KB)

Drug-Related deaths in the UK - annual report 2008

St George's Hospital Medical School, 2008.
The National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths (np-SAD) has published its latest report on drug-related deaths in the UK. The report provides a number of indicators of drug abuse patterns, trends and early warnings on emerging drug problems.
Web: Executive summary - http://www.sgul.ac.uk/dms/9AAB5551CA103A0F7D26FE199BFD83FD.pdf

Deaths related to drug poisoning in England and Wales, 2003-07

ONS, Health Statistics Quarterly 39, Autumn 2008.
This report presents the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) database of deaths from drug-related poisoning for the period 2003 to 2007, and includes new data for 2007.
Download: Report (PDF 105KB)

Drug related deaths in Scotland in 2007

UK. Scotland. General Register Office for Scotland, 2008.
This paper describes the system by which the Registrar General for Scotland collects information on drug-related deaths in Scotland and presents selected statistical information covering the period 1997 to 2007.
Web: http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/files1/stats/drug-related-deaths-in-scotland-2007/drug-related-deaths-in-scotland-2007.pdf (PDF)

Trends in deaths related to drug misuse in England and Wales, 1993-2004

Morgan O., Griffiths, C., Toson B., Rooney C., Majeed A., Hickman M., UK. Office for National Statistics, 2006.
This article reports trends in deaths related to drug misuse in England and Wales from 1993 to 2004, looking particularly at the period between 1999 and 2004, for which there was a Government target to reduce these deaths by 20 per cent. Although there was an overall decline in deaths related to drug misuse between 1999 and 2004, the percentage reduction, at 9 per cent, was less than the Government target. There was an increase in deaths between 2003 and 2004, largely accounted for by deaths involving heroin/methadone and morphine. Mortality rates were highest in young adults and an increase in mortality rates within this group appears to have been the driver behind rising mortality trends during the 1990s.
Download: http://www.statistics.gov.uk/downloads/theme_health/HSQ31.pdf

Trends in death associated with abuse of volatile substances 1971-2004.

Field-Smith M.E., Butland B.K., Ramsay J.D., Anderson H.R. St George's Hospital Medical School. Department of Community Health Sciences. St George's Hospital Medical School, 2006.
This report brings the data set of deaths associated with volatile substances up to date to 2004.
Available to buy online: http://bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/id/Trends_in_Death_Associated_with
_Abuse_of_Volatile_Substances_Rep/9781898183266

Drug-related deaths in the UK

Ghodse H., Corkery J., Oyefeso A., Schifano F., Tonia T., Annan J.
St George's university Hospital, 2006.
This latest report from the National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths (np-SAD) has found that there has been a 6% decline in the number of drug-related deaths occurring. The report contains information on the number of drug-related deaths for the year 2005.
Download: Full report
(PDF 564KB)

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